History of Judo – a famous martial art of Japan

Origin of Japanese martial arts

The Takeouchi-ryu martial arts system was founded in 1532 and is considered the beginning of Japanese Jujitsu martial arts. Judo originated from Jujitsu, the art of attacking and defending without using weapons.

Jūdō is a Japanese martial art that was founded in 1882 by martial arts teacher and professor Kano Jigoro (1860-1938) on the basis of the Japanese traditional Jūjitsu. Jūjitsu is a martial art that fights with breaking arms, breaking the neck, easily hurting students, so Kano removed those violent elements and made Judo more sporty.

Judo does not use weapons, but the main attacks are to fall, crush, strangle and lock hands and feet. Slashing and stabbing with hands and feet as well as defensive weapons are part of judo, but only in advance arrangements and are not allowed in judo or practice competitions. A judo practitioner is called a judoka.

Kodokan Judo

In 1882, TS. Jigoro Kano (Father of Judo) conducted a comprehensive study of the ancient defensive martial arts and integrates the best martial arts into a sport called Kodokan Judo.

Professor Kano applied the most refined parts of Jujitsu and removed the bad parts to create the Kodokan Judo. In a few years, Kodokan Judo was perfected and became excellent. The most evident is when the Kodokan Judo students won overwhelmingly Jujitsu athletes at the Bujitsu Police Competition.

By about 1887, the Kodokan Judo was clearly classified. The Kodokan divides three major goals for students: physical education, effective competition and mental training.

Olympic sports

Professor Kano became the first Asian member of the International Olympic Committee in 1909. He always strives for the development of Judo worldwide. Judo became an official sport at the Tokyo Olympics in 1964 and received support from Judo fans and sports promoters around the world.

Jigoro Kano

Jigoro Kano has achieved a doctorate in Judo, a level equivalent to the twelfth rank, only awarded to the founder. He constantly researched and worked on sports development in general and Japanese sports in particular. He is known as the Father of Japanese sports. In 1935, he was awarded the Asahi Prize for his outstanding contributions to sports organization in Japan throughout his life.